Major energy users report carbon emissions cut

14 June, 2013

Want the latest procurement and supply chain news delivered straight to your inbox? Sign up for the Supply Management Daily   

14 June 2013 | Andrew Allen

Corporations are increasingly seeing the reduction of carbon emissions as a way of managing risk and improving efficiency, according to research by environmental data company amee.

The company found 70 per cent of participants in the government’s Carbon Reduction Commitment (CRC) Energy Efficiency Scheme reported a reduction in emissions. Companies classified as major energy users must participate in the CRC.

From 2011 to 2012, total carbon dioxide emissions fell from 29 million tonnes to 26 million tonnes – a reduction of around 10 per cent.

Tim Murphy, CEO of amee, said: “Corporates are moving away from viewing sustainability as simply stakeholder reporting, and increasingly seeing it as a key measurement of risk, improved supplier interaction and enhanced business efficiency.”

David Shields, managing director of the Government Procurement Service (GPS) said in a statement: “While the most forward-thinking businesses are implementing plans that improve both their own and their supply chains’ emissions, not enough understand their suppliers’ environmental performance and the tangible risks associated with it.

“Measuring and sharing environmental and financial metrics provides valuable insight for all businesses and a key lens on risk.”

GPS is encouraging all suppliers to measure and report emissions via amee’s free portal amee.com.

Shields is to leave his position in June and is to be succeeded by government deputy CPO Sally Collier.

According to a recent study by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Boston Consulting Group, more than one-third of companies are reporting a profit from their sustainability efforts.





Add comment